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2017 SUMMER CONFERENCE
Midwest Public Affairs Conference (MPAC)
 
Teaching Public Administration Conference (TPAC)
 
Social Equity Leadership Conference (SELC)

Link to Conference Program

 

Nearly two decades into the new millennium public administration scholars and practitioners, in America and globally, face a number of challenges in dealing with the ever more complex problems of changing workforce demographics, providing affordable health care, environmental sustainability and social equity and inclusivity to name a few.

  • How do we successfully address these challenges?

  • How can administrative success be enhanced through how public administration is taught?

  • What competencies are needed to prepare students to be successful in public service?

The conference explored these challenges and others along with alternatives for addressing them and demonstrated best practices 

Index of TPAC Presentations

THURSDAY: 1ST CONCURRENT SESSION 9:40 AM TO 11:00 AM

TPAC PANEL | PROFESSIONAL CITIZENS AND PUBLIC SERVICE VALUES | MBSC GALLERY

Moderator: Eric Click, Associate Professor, Park University

This panel explores and debates critical public service values through competencies in education, workforce development, healthcare, and mentoring.

1)  Education and Public Service Values: Ethics and Non-Profit Eric Click, Associate Professor Park University (PPT Presentation)

2)  The MPA Curriculum and Nonprofit Job Based Competencies Rebekkah Stuteville, Professor Park University (PPT Presentation)

3)  Instilling Public Service Values in the Healthcare Environment Suzanne Discenza, Professor (Ret.) and Lecturer Park University and UC Denver, School of Public Affairs

4)  Using Mentoring to Teach Public Service Values in the Classroom Melissa C. Emerson, Assistant Professor University of Wisconsin-Stout

 

THURSDAY: 2ND CONCURRENT SESSION 11:10 AM TO 12:30 PM

 

TPAC PANEL | BEST PRACTICES IN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING | MBSC COUNCIL

Chair: Alicia Schatteman, Associate Professor, Northern Illinois University

1)  Beyond Service Learning: Using Experiential Courses to Promote Public Intellectualism and Negate Town-Gown Tensions  (PPT Presentation)

Hannah Lebowitz, Doctoral Student Cleveland State University

Del Bharath, Doctoral Candidate University of Nebraska at Omaha

2)  Engaging Students through Non-Traditional Classroom Experiences Melanie Smith, Assistant Professor

Jim Vanderleeuw, Associate Dean of the Hauptmann School Terry Ward, Assistant Professor

Park University

3)  Show Me the Money: Teaching Fundraising and Philanthropy through Service Learning Alicia Schatteman, Associate Professor

Northern Illinois University (PPT Presentation)

 

THURSDAY: 3RD CONCURRENT SESSION 2:10 PM TO 3:30 PM

 

TPAC WORKSHOP | CINEMATIC REPRESENTATIONS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS AS A TEACHING RESOURCE | MBSC UMOHO

Facilitator: Lois Warner, Assistant Teaching Professor, Rutgers University

Learn best practices for enhancing courses by incorporating positive representations of public administrators, from demonstrations based on contemporary films, and from examples provided for lesson plans. (PPT Presentation)

 

THURSDAY: 4TH CONCURRENT SESSION 3:40 PM TO 5:00 PM

 

TPAC DEMONSTRATION | EQUIPPING STUDENTS TO COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY AS PRACTITIONERS | MBSC 222

Presenter: Lora Frecks, Doctoral Candidate, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Students in MPA programs are expected to meet certain expectations in their written and verbal communications and can come to consider these standards as normal and desirable. However, these academic expectations are not always applicable to workplace communications with fellow public administrators or community members.

This presentation will include some quick and easy techniques for practitioners to monitor the accessibility of communications. It will also include some ideas for incorporating these techniques into the classroom without distracting from academic communication expectations or consuming too much time. A handout summarizing the proposed techniques and strategies will be available.

 

 

TPAC BEST PRACTICES | TEACHING PROCUREMENT COMPETENCIES | MBSC 224

Chair: Daniela Schroeter, Assistant Professor, Western Michigan University

1)  Contracting as a Core Knowledge Area Howard Pierce, Supervisory Contracting Officer Department of Defense

2)  Theory, Practice, and Adult Learning: Insights from a Graduate Program Director in Public Procurement and Contract Management

Joshua Steinfeld, Assistant Professor Old Dominion University

 

FRIDAY: 1ST CONCURRENT SESSION 9:00 AM TO 10:20 AM 

TPAC PANEL | EXAMINING GRADUATE PA EDUCATION IN THE U.S. | SESSION 1 | MBSC COUNCIL

Chair: Ben Tafoya, Doctoral Programs Director, Walden University

1)  The Evolution of Nonprofit Management and Philanthropic Studies in the United States: Are We Now a Disciplinary Field?

Roseanne Mirabella, Professor Seton Hall University

2)  Doctoral Education Development of Public Administration and Public Policy Derek R. Slagle

Adam M. Williams, Assistant Professor University of Illinois Springfield

 

TPAC BEST PRACTICES |USING SIMULATIONS TO TEACH BUDGETING SKILLS AND HOW TO NAVIGATE THE POLITICS OF THE BUDGETING PROCESS | MBSC GALLERY

Chair: Alex Heckman, Chair Department of Public Administration, Chair Public Administration Programs, Franklin University

1)  The Use of In-Class Simulations to Teach the Local Government Budgeting Process Darrin Wilson, Assistant Professor Eastern Kentucky University

2)  Using a Computer Simulation to Teach Students about Navigating the Ethics and Politics of the Budgeting Process

Alex Heckman, Chair Department of Public Administration, Chair Public Administration Programs Franklin University (PPT Presentation)

  

FRIDAY: 2ND CONCURRENT SESSION 10:30 AM TO 11:50 AM

 

TPAC PANEL | EXAMINING GRADUATE PA EDUCATION IN THE U.S. | SESSION 2 | MBSC 224

Chair: Michael Popejoy, Nova Science Publishers

1)  Student Competency and Solving Complex Problems: Analysis from NASPAA Accreditation Crystal  Calarusse, Chief Accreditation Officer NASPAA

2)  Do Perceptions of Fit and Program Orientation Matter on the Career Preferences of Students in Public Administration Programs?

Leonard Bright, Assistant Provost of Graduate and Professional Studies, Associate Professor Texas A&M University

 

TPAC WORKSHOP | TEACHING RESEARCH DESIGN VIA SYSTEMATIC REVIEW | MBSC DODGE A

Presenter: Daniela Schroeter, Assistant Professor, Western Michigan University

Doctoral-level research methods courses need to go beyond developing critical users of research to developing effective researchers and teachers of research methods. To do that requires in-depth understanding of what research is being conducted and used in the public administration profession. The course illustrated in this demonstration is intended to deliver core course content and at the same time initiate original research with potential for publication. Upon completing the course, students should be able to (1) effectively engage and collaborate in applied research projects, (2) understand uses of research design in public administration, (3) use varying research software, (4) transfer research findings into curriculum recommendation, and (5) apply research design to their dissertation ideas. This demonstration will show initial plans for the course and discuss adaptations made midcourse to maximize learning outcomes. Tentative findings from the review process will be illustrated and lessons learned from this course will be shared.

 

FRIDAY: 3RD CONCURRENT SESSION 1:30 PM TO 2:50 PM

 

 TPAC WORKSHOP | TWO-MINUTES BEFORE CLASS... | MBSC CHANCELLOR’S ROOM

Facilitators: Linda-Marie Sundstrom, Associate Professor; and Stephen Brown, Associate Dean of Student Development; California Baptist University

A common complaint among students in an asynchronous learning environment is the feeling of being disconnected from faculty and other students, and feeling a lack of dynamic feedback received from faculty and peers. This workshop will provide attendees with tools to help create the “connection” between students and faculty that goes beyond the text-driven discussion board style of communication. Workshop attendees will have a hands-on opportunity to create a PowerPoint Presentation with photos and graphics, animate the slides, record and audio track, upload the file to YouTube, and learn to use the free Closed Captioned feature built into YouTube. Attendees will also create a brief screencast with audio using a free software, Screencast-O-Matic. There will also be a brief hands-on session using PowToons and Zoom. Additionally, other tools will be demonstrated including Camtasia and green screen options. Attendees will also be given an opportunity to share techniques they have found helpful with the group. If possible, it is recommended that attendees bring their laptops to the workshop and have the latest version of PowerPoint updated on their system. (PPT Presentation)

 

TPAC ROUNDTABLE | FINDING A PLACE FOR CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES IN NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT EDUCATION | MBSC GALLERY

A discussion about how nonprofit educators can apply a critical perspective on nonprofit management in the classroom such that it goes beyond the instrumental and managerial ideologies that dominate the field, to recognize that there are multiple ways to think about important topics in the field.

Angela Eikenberry, Professor University of Nebraska at Omaha

Roseanne Mirabella, Professor Seton Hall University (PPT Presentation)

 

FRIDAY: 4TH CONCURRENT SESSION 3:00 PM TO 4:20 PM

TPAC ROUNDTABLE| PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN THE TRUMP ERA - THROWING OUT THE TEXTBOOK | MBSC UMOHO

With the increasingly rapid change of pace in Washington, DC under President Trump, the traditional way of teaching public administration topics and the current textbooks seem somehow inadequate. From issues of judicial review and The Hatch Act to the Politics-Administration Dichotomy and the agenda setting process, the staples of public administration courses seem to be finding their way into the consciousness of everyday

Americans. Accordingly, we as educators need to stop and reflect about how we are teaching these subjects and how we are incorporating the current state of government into our teaching. A panel discussion surrounding this topic would offer insights into how educators are coping with challenge and provide suggestions as to how to best utilize this opportunity to engage students in real-world discussions.

Michelle Wooddell, Grand Valley State University

Michael Popejoy, Nova Science Publishers (PPT Presentation) (Paper)